Children reading books coloring pages

Published at Monday, 24 February 2020.

Years ago, paint was paint. One kind looked, smelled, was applied and eventually dried much like another. Things are different now. Besides oil paints, you can choose from a new set of paints. It'll pay you to know about them. • There are water paints you can use outside. (You clean your brushes under the faucet and use the garden hose to get spatters off the shrubbery.) • There are finishes so tough they withstand even attacks from the neighbors' children. • There are paints that dry so fast you start the second coat as soon as you finish putting on the first. • There are colors in glittering confusion. What colors are prevailing - tonal or local, warm or cold? THE COMPOSITION. Now go back to the subject and your first impressions about the painting. It's time to analyze how the artist made you feel the way you felt using the artistic means it his/her disposal. The composition is the position and the balance of the objects and figures in the space, the interrelation of their size, coloring, shading etc. How exactly does all that impact your perception? Let's dig in.

The lite version of Galkyd is simply thinner. I use it more than the other. I love it. Paintings I did 16 years ago using Galkyds look as pristine as the day I painted them. You'll also need a canvas and some paint. I buy a tube of red, green, blue, purple, yellow, brown, white and black. I prefer what's called Ivory Black and a soft mixing white as you'll add white to a lot of different colors to make lighter versions. From these basic colors you can make any exotic color by mixing them in combination's. Be creative and experiment. And don't be afraid of color, because color is the most popular in museums! The bright paintings are historically the crowd favorites. As for color variety from these basic colors, mix red and white to make pink, mix yellow with green to make lime green, white with blue to make light blue, white with black to make gray, etc. Use your common sense and play with it! You'll also need pencils, an eraser and some Turpentine or Turpentine substitute. Keep your brushes soaking in it in a plastic cup to keep them clean and ready for your next color choice.... and to keep them from drying out. STIPPLING. Whether you desire the effect of stippling (tiny paint dots) as a decorative effect, or if you have a wall which has an uneven surface and you feel you can hide the defect by stippling it, you may accomplish this result very simply. "Boxing" is a good method of mixing paints. Since paint is a mixture of solids and liquids, it is important that it be mixed thoroughly before using. To do this, the greater portion of the liquid contents of the can should be poured in a clean bucket somewhat larger than the paint can. Then, with a stiff paddle, the settled pigment in the original container should be loosened and any lumps broken up. After this, mix the material in the container thoroughly, using a figure 8 motion, and follow with a lifting and beating motion. Continue stirring the mixture vigorously while slowly adding the liquid that was previously poured off the top. Complete the mixing by pouring the paint back and forth from one container to the other several times until the entire amount is of uniform consistency. TERTIARY COLORS. Tertiary colors are made by mixing one primary color with one secondary color. For instance, mixing the primary color blue with the secondary color green, will give you a tertiary color called blue-green.

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