Coloring pages of simple plan band

Published at Thursday, 12 March 2020.

OK, let's get started. Step one...supplies. You need a flat brush, a fan, a small detail brush and a couple of Filberts. A filbert is a rounded edge brush that lets you maneuver the paint easily without going outside the edges. Ultimately buy brushes that you like though, and make them work. Fans allow you to blend, for example. I use fans a lot and it's how I graduate color throughout my images. Everything I paint is by hand....no airbrushing or assistants. I want it to be an expression of me and nobody else. You also need an oil painting medium to mix with the oil paint to make it more fluid, and to speed or slow the drying process. Whichever you prefer. Go to the art store and don't be afraid to ask for help....they'll love helping you! A medium is merely an additive liquid which increases gloss, makes it flow easily, preserves the finish over time, keeps it from yellowing. I personally love Galkyd and Galkyd Lite. If that isn't available, buy a medium that looks like liquid amber and is kind of thick. Don't buy watery looking mediums....too hard to work with. Proper brush technique: When "cutting in" with a paint brush you should dip the brush in paint and tap the sides of the bucket on each side of the brush, leaving a good amount on the brush so you are able to minimize the times you will need to dip/load the brush. Next, take the brush and make a one foot to two foot line down the wall about an inch or two away from the trim or surface you are going to paint up next to, this is much like taking a knife full of butter and spreading it across an entire slice of bread. After, spreading the paint over the section, go back and even the paint out evenly across the section and cut up next to the trim with the brush. You want to paint up next to the trim or surfaced to be cut-in with the paint brush after you have released most of the paint on the wall, it is easier to cut in with the tips of the brush exposed and not loaded with a lot of paint. Another popular color wheel called the Munsell color wheel, is slightly more involved. Instead of 6 basic colors, the Munsell wheel consists of ten colors: red, yellow-red, yellow, yellow-green, green, blue-green, blue, blue-violet, red-violet and violet.

To balance, you must grasp the interconnectedness of color schemes. All these interactions are defined in the color wheel, and it has been used to build color schemes for centuries. A flat, semi-gloss, or high-gloss finish may be applied to the primed surface. For a flat finish, two coats of flat wall paint should follow the priming coat. For a semi-gloss finish, one coat of flat wall paint and one coat of semi-gloss paint should be applied to the primed surface. For a high-gloss finish, one coat of semi-gloss paint and one coat of high-gloss enamel should be used over the priming coat. The correct roller to use depends on the texture of the wall. On smooth walls you will need a 1/2" nap and on textured surfaces it will be more like a 3/4" - 1" nap depending on how rough the texture is. I always recommend a lamb skin, it will lay the paint off the best and provide maximum coverage. A roller pole is also great for saving your back, shoulder and arms from repetitious bending over and extension. If you will be using the roller for a couple of days, the same rule applies as with the brush, seal it in plastic completely to preserve it for the next day. Do not leave the roller submersed in paint or water over night, this will cause premature failure, by releasing the skin from the hardboard backing it is attached to. If you will be rolling a rough texture, like a stucco, make sure to purchase a roller frame (arm) that is sturdy and will hold up to constant applied pressure. Use the painting project as an excuse to give your home a thorough spring cleaning and get rid of any clutter.

Leave a Reply