Free day of the dead coloring pages

Published at Sunday, 15 March 2020.

Amateur house painters never had as much help as today. Scores of new paints and equipment placed on the market in the last few years make it possible for the weekend handyman to paint his own house almost as easily as a professional. From one-coat paints to disposable blowtorches, everything has been designed to make the job go faster, look better and cost less. OK, let's get started. Step one...supplies. You need a flat brush, a fan, a small detail brush and a couple of Filberts. A filbert is a rounded edge brush that lets you maneuver the paint easily without going outside the edges. Ultimately buy brushes that you like though, and make them work. Fans allow you to blend, for example. I use fans a lot and it's how I graduate color throughout my images. Everything I paint is by hand....no airbrushing or assistants. I want it to be an expression of me and nobody else. You also need an oil painting medium to mix with the oil paint to make it more fluid, and to speed or slow the drying process. Whichever you prefer. Go to the art store and don't be afraid to ask for help....they'll love helping you! A medium is merely an additive liquid which increases gloss, makes it flow easily, preserves the finish over time, keeps it from yellowing. I personally love Galkyd and Galkyd Lite. If that isn't available, buy a medium that looks like liquid amber and is kind of thick. Don't buy watery looking mediums....too hard to work with. You'll need a large compressor, not just the typical 20 gallon variety most of us have. This is a 60 gallon, vertical compressor with typically a 5+ hp motor. Then you'll need a decent paint gun (possibly 2; one for primer and one for color) which again is an expense. Then there's the question of where you'll paint the car. Renting a paint booth is best, but can be expensive and hard to find. You can always seal up your garage or shoot out in the wetted down driveway, but you'll inevitably get dirt and moisture into the paint.

Solvent or oil-based paints are used where a tough, durable finish is required for interior and exterior timber, masonry and furniture - although, as mentioned above, the new generation of acrylics and multi-surface paints offers viable alternatives. In general, brushes need to be cleaned with turpentine or white spirit. Once the drywall compound/spackle has had sufficient time to dry, you will need to lightly sand the surface of the repair to smooth out any ridges that may have been caused while "coating" the patch. Once you have the surface sanded smooth, take a wet sponge or cloth and, by lightly washing/rubbing, blend the outside edge of the drywall compound/spackle back into the wall. For a smaller repair, you can wash away the excess drywall compound, leaving only the compound/spackle only in the area where the indent was filled. For a larger hole, after filling, sanding and using a wet sponge to blend the outside edge of the compound back into the wall, it may be necessary to texture the area in order to give the smooth patch the appearance of the existing wall. When you have all the tools at hand, examine your exterior. You might find exterior painting problems, which could be any of the following: alligatoring, blistering, chalking, chalk run down, crackling, dirt pickup, efflorescence, fading, frosting, lapping, mildew, nail head rusting, paint incompatibility, peeling, poor alkali resistance, poor adhesion, poor gloss retention, surfacent leaching, staining, vinyl siding wrap, wax bleed, or wrinkling. If you have a timber floor that's not particularly attractive or is made from a patchwork of old and new wood, paint makes the perfect disguise. There are plenty of choices - all the colours from Farrow & Ball are available as floor paint and Nordic Style offers an elegant selection, too.

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