Mazuras mandala coloring pages

Published at Wednesday, 22 January 2020.

OK, let's get started. Step one...supplies. You need a flat brush, a fan, a small detail brush and a couple of Filberts. A filbert is a rounded edge brush that lets you maneuver the paint easily without going outside the edges. Ultimately buy brushes that you like though, and make them work. Fans allow you to blend, for example. I use fans a lot and it's how I graduate color throughout my images. Everything I paint is by hand....no airbrushing or assistants. I want it to be an expression of me and nobody else. You also need an oil painting medium to mix with the oil paint to make it more fluid, and to speed or slow the drying process. Whichever you prefer. Go to the art store and don't be afraid to ask for help....they'll love helping you! A medium is merely an additive liquid which increases gloss, makes it flow easily, preserves the finish over time, keeps it from yellowing. I personally love Galkyd and Galkyd Lite. If that isn't available, buy a medium that looks like liquid amber and is kind of thick. Don't buy watery looking mediums....too hard to work with. If you decide to do your own body work discuss it with the paint shop first. They'll probably have recommendations on the type of primer you use. Some brands will be more compatible with their primers or color coats. The rule of thumb is to stay within the same brand of paint, both for prep and color. Even the cheapest paint shops typically use a brand name on their intermediate and higher paint jobs. Find out what it is and use the same brand as your primer coat. This will ensure you don't create adhesion problems for yourself down the road. CONCLUSION. Once again go through the images and the story of the painting. Was your first impression different from what you see now? Take a 5-minute online test to explore your preferences in fine arts. In 5 minutes you will confidently say "I prefer impressionist cityscapes", or "This room calls for a color field painting", "I need to have an art nouveau nude in my bedroom" - and you will know what you are talking about!

Better still, you don't have to spend hours getting ready and hours cleaning up afterward. Premixed paints, electric-drill attachments and self-dispensing calking guns make short work of preparation. Cleaning up is a soap-and-water job for the rubber paints, or a quick dip in special cleaners for the oils. Disposable dropcloths and paper paint pails are used once and thrown away. A large whitewash brush is best for applying the wash. One should not attempt to brush out the coating, as in applying oil paint, but simply spread the whitewash on as evenly and quickly as possible. And if you are changing colors be sure you and the paint shop are crystal clear on what color they're going to spray. Never just describe the color. You won't get what you want. Guaranteed. If you're not using a factory original color then find out what kind of car the color you want came on. Give the shop a year, model and paint name and then insist on seeing a paint chip. Take the chip outside to see it in the sun light and verify that it's what you want. There's nothing more disappointing then spending all these hours and money only to watch your car come out of the shop the wrong color. How to Paint your Mustang or other Classic Car on a budget

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